Environmental Stewardship

Committed to our Natural Resources

We Believe in Being Responsible Stewards of Our Natural Resources

A Message from the Vice President of Sustainability

We are committed to strengthening our environmental stewardship.

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Tracking Our Aggressive Five-Year Environmental Sustainability Goals

In 2018, we elevated efforts by establishing aggressive five-year goals for reductions in greenhouse gases, water use and solid waste by 2022.

Our 2018 Progress

As we promised, here is our progress toward these goals:

REDUCED OUR GREENHOUSE GAS INTENSITY BY

4.8%

REDUCED OUR WATER USE INTENSITY BY

6.9%

INCREASED SOLID-WASTE DIVERSION FROM LANDFILLS BY

6.5%

 

Our long-standing environmental sustainability efforts have included goals for reducing our environmental footprint. Compared with our 2015 baseline, we have:

REDUCED OUR GREENHOUSE GAS INTENSITY BY

1.0%

REDUCED OUR WATER USE INTENSITY BY

1.4%

IMPROVEDWASTE DIVERTED FROM LANDFILLSFROM

73%-74.5%

Perdue Stewardship Updates

Processing Soybeans with Renewable Energy & Recycled Water

Processing Soybeans with Renewable Energy & Recycled Water

In building Pennsylvania’s first large-scale, commercial soybean crushing plant in Bainbridge, Pa., Perdue AgriBusiness tapped into existing waste-to-energy and reduced transport emissions to bring a 72 percent net reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (Scope 1, 2 and 3) over current operations.

Perdue formed a unique partnership with the Lancaster County Solid Waste Management Authority (LCSWMA), which allows the Bainbridge plant to have a smaller environmental footprint than the typical soybean processing plant.

Washington, Ind., Facility Increases Total Landfill Diversion to 92 Percent

Washington, Ind., Facility Increases Total Landfill Diversion to 92 Percent

Going from zero waste diversion to diverting 1.5 million pounds of unrecyclable trash to energy production last year has contributed to the Washington, Ind., turkey processing facility’s continued growth in landfill diversion, now at 92 percent. Trash that previously was landfilled now goes to a thermal conversion center, where it is turned into steam and electricity destined for the Indianapolis power grid. The plant also increased its recycling of cardboard, plastic buckets (including metal handles), food-grade trays and other plastic. Pounds of waste going to the landfill declined significantly, a 68 percent reduction over the prior year, with the amount of materials being recycled reaching 84 percent.

Simple Water Test Results in Significant Energy Savings

Simple Water Test Results in Significant Energy Savings

Perry, Ga., facility Environmental Manager Stacie Harris and team identified the four 300-horsepower blowers in the wastewater treatment plant as a prime opportunity for reaching the plant’s energy reduction goals. The blowers supply air to the aeration basins to keep the microbiological “bugs” alive and healthy. The key to reducing fan use was found in a simple test called a jar test that, when done, consistently helps ensure appropriate pre-treatment of water going to the basin. Good pre-treatment avoids under- or overfeeding the bacteria and keeps oxygen levels stable. The result has been an average of 10 percent energy savings per month versus the previous year. An unexpected benefit has been $100,000-plus in cost savings on pre-treatment chemicals.

"Water Sheriffs" Arrest Water Waste

"Water Sheriffs" Arrest Water Waste

A one-week focus on reducing water use and waste is delivering long-term results in three Perdue facilities. Continuous Improvement managers at Concord, N.C.; Monterey, Tenn.; and Petaluma, Calif., conducted Rapid Results Rallies in November 2018 to put a focus on saving water. A clever approach used at two locations was to designate “Water Sheriffs” who “arrested” department or team leads for wasting water. It was up to the associates on each team to “bail” them out by identifying water-saving opportunities and scoring points for positive activities.

Water use at the Monterey facility is down by 21 percent, for a savings of nearly 75,000 gallons a day, while Concord’s use has declined by 23 percent, or 52,000 fewer gallons a day.

Poultry Litter a Valuable Resource for Farmers Who Raise Our Poultry

The farmers who raise our poultry retain ownership of their litter because it is a resource that has financial value to them. For farmers whose crops need the nutrients in poultry litter, it can offset the costs of chemical fertilizers while improving soil quality. For those who cannot or do not want to use their litter, it is an agricultural commodity that can be sold to generate additional farm income or bartered. As such, the litter from a typical poultry farm is worth several thousand dollars per year to the farmer.

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Conserving & Recycling

Conserving & Recycling

We believe in being responsible with our natural resources.

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Engagement

Engagement

We believe in engaging our associates.

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Corporate Stewardship Report

Company Stewardship Report

Learn about the steps we're taking to reach our goal of becoming the most-trusted name in food and agricultural products.

Consumer Brands
Perdue
Perdue Simply Smart Organics
Perdue Harvestland
Coleman Natural
Draper Valley
Petaluma Poultry
Praire Grove Farms
Niman Ranch
Panorama Meats
Spot Farms Pet
Full Moon Pet
Business to Business
Perdue Foodservice
Perdue Foods
Perdue Foods International
Perdue agriBusiness